Terms Of Use | Privacy Policy

LOGIN >

Clinical Trials

Breakthroughs Begin With You

.

Breakthroughs Begin With  You

The Stephenson Cancer Center is a nationally recognized leader in conducting clinical trials research for new cancer therapies. The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top two cancer centers in the nation for the number of patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical treatment trials.

One in three patients at the Stephenson chooses to participate in a clinical trial. By participating in trials, patients not only receive the latest treatment options available, they are taking a active role in discovering cancer breakthroughs. 

Participation also ensures that patients receive the highest standard of care available anywhere. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) - which develops treatment guidelines for cancer - states the best management for any patient with cancer is in a clinical trial.

What are Clinical Trials?

Clinical trials are research studies that help researchers and physicians find new and better ways to prevent and treat cancer. 

Participation provides patients with access to new cancer drugs, new combinations of drugs, new approaches to surgery and radiation therapy, and new ways to improve quality of life. 

Every cancer-fighting therapy available today was tested in a clinical trial.

National Leader

As a national leader in clinical trials, the Stephenson Cancer Center ranks among the top three centers in the nation for patient accrual to National Cancer Institute-designated treatment trials.

Learn more about our national leadership in clinical trials >

NCI National Clinical Trials Network

Phase I Program

The Oklahoma TSET Phase I Program brings the latest and most advanced therapies to Oklahoma. We are the state's only phase I clinical trials program, serving patients in all 77 counties.

Learn more about the state's only phase I clinical trials program >

state affiliate network

The Stephenson Cancer Center wants to ensure that patients receive treatment as close to home as possible. We offer many of our National Cancer Institute trials through our statewide affiliate network.

Learn more about our statewide clinical trials network >

Find a Clinical Trial

Frequently Asked Questions

What are clinical trials?

A clinical trial is a study in humans carefully designed to help determine if a treatment, a medical procedure or method is safe and effective to the general public.

Why are clinical trials important?

Advances in medicine are the result of new ideas and approaches developed through research. Before they can be made available to the general public, new cancer treatments must prove to be safe and effective in clinical trials with specific populations of patients.

Through clinical trials, researchers learn which drugs and procedures are safe, and which are most effective. Most standard treatments in use today were first shown to be effective in clinical trials. These trials help us find new and better treatments.

  • Treatment Trials - test new therapies that may increase the life expectancy or reduce suffering in people who have a serious illness.
  • Prevention Trials - test new approaches like medicines, vaccines, vitamins, minerals or other supplements that doctors believe may lower the risk of a certain disease.
  • Detection Trials - test the best way to find a disease, especially in its early stages.
  • Supportive Care Trials - explore ways to improve comfort and quality of life for patients with a disease.
  • Genetics Trials - meant to improve the ability to look for an inherited risk of illness.

What are important questions to ask about a clinical trial?

Most new treatments are the result of new ideas generated from initial laboratory experiments. When researchers are ready to evaluate a new treatment or test in people, they carefully design clinical trials to test the treatment's effectiveness, its safety, and its side effects. Clinical trials follow an orderly progression of steps or phases (designed by the Food and Drug Administration, or FDA) to take the drug or procedure under study from discovery to approval.

Phase I Trials: The purpose of a Phase I trial is to define the best dose of a new drug, its side effects and, potentially, the types of cancer against which this new drug may work. These trials are first-in-human studies and represent a critical step in drug development from the laboratory to the clinic. Most standard cancer treatments were first studied in Phase I clinical trials, and these studies provide an opportunity for a late-stage cancer patient to receive a new type of treatment if his/her cancer does not respond to standard treatment or if there is no standard treatment available. About 15-30 patients are usually enrolled in phase I trials.

Phase II Trials: A Phase II trial continues to test the safety of the drug, and begins to evaluate how well the new drug works. These studies usually focus on a particular aspect of a disease. Like phase I trials, these trials do not test the differences between two therapies, so the participants will almost always get the experimental treatment. About 50-100 patients are usually enrolled in phase II trials.

Phase III Trials: A Phase III trial tests a new drug, a new combination of drugs, or a new surgical procedure in comparison to the current standard for treatment. A participant will usually be randomly assigned to the standard treatment group or the new treatment group. Phase III trials often enroll thousands of people and may be conducted at many doctors' offices, clinics, and disease centers nationwide.

Phase IV Trials: In Phase IV trials, researchers study drugs and or treatments that have already received FDA approval. The goal of Phase IV trials is to study how safe and effective a drug or procedure is over time.

What are the stages of the clinical trials process?

Most new treatments are the result of new ideas generated from initial laboratory experiments. When researchers are ready to evaluate a new treatment or test in people, they carefully design clinical trials to test the treatment's effectiveness, its safety, and its side effects. Clinical trials follow an orderly progression of steps or phases (designed by the Food and Drug Administration, or FDA) to take the drug or procedure under study from discovery to approval.

Phase I Trials: The purpose of a Phase I trial is to define the best dose of a new drug, its side effects and, potentially, the types of cancer against which this new drug may work. These trials are first-in-human studies and represent a critical step in drug development from the laboratory to the clinic. Most standard cancer treatments were first studied in Phase I clinical trials, and these studies provide an opportunity for a late-stage cancer patient to receive a new type of treatment if his/her cancer does not respond to standard treatment or if there is no standard treatment available. About 15-30 patients are usually enrolled in phase I trials.

Phase II Trials: A Phase II trial continues to test the safety of the drug, and begins to evaluate how well the new drug works. These studies usually focus on a particular aspect of a disease. Like phase I trials, these trials do not test the differences between two therapies, so the participants will almost always get the experimental treatment. About 50-100 patients are usually enrolled in phase II trials.

Phase III Trials: A Phase III trial tests a new drug, a new combination of drugs, or a new surgical procedure in comparison to the current standard for treatment. A participant will usually be randomly assigned to the standard treatment group or the new treatment group. Phase III trials often enroll thousands of people and may be conducted at many doctors' offices, clinics, and disease centers nationwide.

Phase IV Trials: In Phase IV trials, researchers study drugs and or treatments that have already received FDA approval. The goal of Phase IV trials is to study how safe and effective a drug or procedure is over time.

What is informed consent?

Am I eligible for a clinical trial?

Every clinical trial is designed to answer a set of research questions. If you fit the guidelines for a trial, you may be eligible to take part. Each study enrolls patients with certain types and stages of cancer and certain health status. A study that involves two or more treatments can yield reliable answers only if all the patient cases are the same so they can be compared with each other. Depending on the study you might be asked for personal information such as:

Gender (sex)
Age
Ethnicity
Education
Occupation
Lifestyle


For cancer specific clinical trials, you will also be asked for a variety of health- and illness-related information such as:

Site of cancer
Stage of cancer
Previous treatments
Previous treatment outcomes
Health and wellness background
Allergy history physical/functional status
Family history

Before a decision is made about your treatment (whether it is a clinical trial or not), your type of cancer will be diagnosed and "staged." Staging tells how far the disease has spread. Deciding on treatment depends on many things, including the stage of the disease and your general condition. You would most likely be referred to a trial by your own doctor or by a doctor who knows your case. Some patients find out about trials from other sources. In any case, you must have a reasonable understanding of your role in a research study and be freely willing to take part in it. Be sure to ask what you can expect if you take part in a trial.

Map Data
Map data ©2016 Google
Map DataMap data ©2016 Google
Map data ©2016 Google
Map
Satellite
50 m